News

AAA Election Report Card

2.11.2001

With one week to go in the election, the Australian Automobile Association has released a Report Card on the motoring policies of the two major parties. The Report Card shows both the Coalition and the ALP have room for substantial improvement.

 

AAA Executive Director, Lauchlan McIntosh, said that from a motorist's point of view the result was disappointing in some key areas.

 

"The interesting aspect of the Report Card is that the areas of good and poor performance were largely different for the two sides, giving an indication of where the priorities of each lie," Mr. McIntosh said.

 

"The Coalition scored well on Fuel Policy and Tax Reform because of the abolition of indexation of excise and for setting up the current fuel tax inquiry. The Coalition also scored well for Road Safety with a renewed commitment to Black Spot funding and an undertaking to mandate improved safety standards in new vehicles.

 

"On the negative side, the Coalition did not score well when it came to infrastructure planning and management. The motoring organisations believe there should be a national ten-year infrastructure plan with a five year rolling work program. We also believe that the setting of priorities should be taken out of the political arena," Mr. McIntosh said.

 

"For Labor, the establishment of a National Infrastructure Advisory Council to provide independent and longer-term planning advice is a plus. The decision to continue current road funding levels overall is positive even though there is no indication of priorities, and the idea of an Infrastructure Kickstart fund appears worthwhile.

 

"On the negative side the ALP has shown a lack of commitment to a national road safety strategy with no guarantee that Black Spot funding will continue. Labor also appears to have ruled out reform of the fuel tax system rather than waiting for the current inquiry to report. Labor's Fuel Policy has the potential to push average fuel prices higher by imposing greater regulation on the industry.

 

"As a motoring organisation representing 6.4 million motorists through our constituent clubs, we do not intend to advise them how they should vote. We do hope, however, that our Report Card and the different policy priorities it highlights, will assist motorists in their decision making," Mr. McIntosh said.

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